twickenham green

Jo Pethybridge – Ceramics

I love working with clay, using both of my hands together. Colour, patterns and nature are also very important to me so to be able to combine all these factors in my art is a great creative driver.

 

I find things that interest me while travelling, walking or in my surroundings, e.g. vineyards, bed mattress springs, pine forests, waves. I take photographs or sketch them. Later I make drawings from them working them into patterns, which I then draw onto my ceramic pieces. These are then painted and glazed.

 

I never regard my pieces as ‘work’ as I get so much pleasure from making them. I have never been tempted to move into probably more lucrative functional pottery as I like to view each piece as an individual one inspired by my latest experiences.

My problem is I have too many ideas and as each piece takes time to complete I have to store some ideas for later. I do often revisit themes to evolve them.

 

While I was working as a therapist and manager being an artist needed to come second, but over the years I have been making ceramics it has become increasingly important to me. Since retiring in 2010 I have been able to concentrate on my art, which has been wonderful. Some of my earliest memories though were of making mud pies in the garden!

 

Art has always been very therapeutic for me, after a hard day at the office it was a great stress buster. It is also very grounding and relaxing.

In my type of ceramics no two pieces are the same, although I do repeat ideas and patterns if I like them but often using different colours.

Because I was working and married I did not need to earn a living from my art, which gave me great freedom in the type of work I was ablre to do. I do find the process of selling and marketing a challenging process. I have enjoyed doing this with other artists in art societies and open house groups.

Art like music I feel will always be present in the world. Art is a good way to express feelings and can be a record of the times.

 

My studio is in the attic ,which has excellent light which is important when making ceramics and plenty of space to store and dry pieces. The only disadvantage is carrying clay stored in the basement up 4 flights of stairs, but it keeps me fit. Painting my pieces can be done anywhere preferably in a comfortable chair with good lighting.

 

 

 

Alexandra Joelle – Jewellery Designer

 


I just love to create and seeing each piece come together is the most satisfying thing in the world.

I always design through experimentation, I couldn’t think of anything worse than being sat in-front of my sketchbook all day trying to come up with ideas from the back of my head that will never appear. So instead I start with the circle and have a play with cutting them into sections folding and then see what frame works I come up with.

If I have a lull in the flow of ideas I might start by making something I’ve made before, most of the time whilst I am absorbed in making a ring or something simple, I come up with a new flow of ideas.   I am constantly searching for inspiration; I always have my sketchbook in my bag in case I think of something on the go.  It basically takes over your life and never comes out of your head.  If I am stuck on how to make something I usually start dreaming about it.  Which is actually usually when I come out with some of my best ideas, so I keep a spare sketchbook right next to my bed!   My work is inspired by the idea of creating tension. All my pieces are built to create simplistic frame works to make the tension with the thread. I am also inspired by using different materials in my work I love working with thread maybe this goes back to my love of fashion design when I was younger. 

I’ve always loved making and drawing things from a young age, when I was little I would spend hours drawing fashion design’s, which for a long time is what I wanted to do.  But being in a family of Jeweller’s and being brought up in those surrounding’s my passions lead me into working with metal.

Although it isn’t reflected in my work I have a real love of history, eventually I would like to look into the past and take more inspiration from there. I also work in an auctioneer’s part time so I get to see a lot of old quirky Jewellery which can be really exciting!

My work environment is very important; I find it very therapeutic to sit with my headphones in without any distractions fiddling away with my pieces, I go into my own little world. I still do like to have people around me; I think being in a workshop on my own could get boring quickly its nice to have other people around to bounce ideas of each other. That’s what’s nice about university, you have a lot of people to bounce your ideas around, and it can be very inspirational.

 My heart’s desire is probably to have my own shop that’s full with my own designs, and to be able to employ and train others, as I think opportunities to train in the industry are very difficult to come by. I was lucky that I have my father to carry on training me, and others don’t always have the opportunity.  At the moment I am just taking everything as it comes, I am getting a good response to my work, so I hope to carry on and continue in developing my work. Having my own workshop would be lovely too! But I am lucky to have a family in the industry so I already have one set up in the corner of my fathers shop; this has saved me a lot of money.

I love working to commission, all of my work is repeatable and very versatile; all of pieces are available in many different colours on request, with combinations of either ribbon or chain.   If money was no object I think any artist could say they would do things differently, materials are very expensive as any Jeweller can tell you. I think the biggest difference is I would want to use gold, as it is personally my favourite material, so any commission pieces are most welcome!   As I am just starting out as an artist, money is in short supply, so marketing is something that I am only just starting to look at and will be pursued more as I go on.  

If I was going to learn another skill it probably would be to work more in textiles, I did textiles in my A ‘levels and have always had a passion for it, so more of a combination with textiles and metalwork, which my work does reflect already, I am looking into weaving and castings at the minute. But this is all a work in progress.

 

Jeremy White – Ceramics

I hate clutter, but my life is lived in a permanent state of clutter and untidiness from which my studio does not escape.   I try to keep it habitable, but somehow I seem to work better in chaos, although I take care to ensure that the finished piece of work is not sloppy.   My Studio is a small space (a Summerhouse in any other life) in the garden.   I look out onto trees and plants and I know that behind me is a stream, meadow, canal, fields and the Chilterns.   All of these feed my imagination and Creativity.

Inspiration is the nub of an idea, either a photograph, or preferably a landscape view ‘en plein air’, which will later germinate into a physical creation.  I also ‘need’ to work, either to tease out a pot from a vague idea.  The need to produce in a physical, tangible form, an idea which is rolling around in my mind sustains me as an artist and the need to make a living drives me, they feed off each other.  If it wasn’t in clay, it would need to be by some other process.  When  I need to develop new work,  I don’t often sit down and think “lets have a new idea”.   It is a process of osmosis where one piece or style of work leads onto or suggests a development to another stage.

Once I have an idea, I will sometimes make very rough  (and very poor) sketches, usually on scraps of paper which I later have to rescue from the recycle bin.  When working on the wheel new shapes, will develop from others, often by accident!  If I have a lull in the flow of new ideas.  I find going back to basics; either throwing 100 mugs, or simple hand building, usually stimulates the grey cells into doing something different!

 

I have always had creativity inside me, but it only blossomed into a concrete form around the age of 25.   I had wanted to be an actor.   At School I got 5% in Mock Science O Level and refused point blank to take the proper exam, and bugged everyone until I was allowed to do Art O level (for which I received my best marks).   Later Ceramics came into my life almost by accident, but I was hooked.   I built, literally, my first studio and immersed myself in making and selling Pots. I also returned to teaching, Ceramics, this time rather than English and Drama. After a period when I was teaching full time, my own creativity stopped and I had a need to do something completely different.   Many years later the call of the clay could no longer be resisted and I returned to full time Potting.  Now it informs my life!  It’s a visual response, by looking at everything from a different point of view, seeing ‘a pot’, potentially in every view or landscape.

 

With regard to commissions, I don’t really like them, unless the brief is VERY open.  When some one has said’ make me one like that’, they usually end up saying, ‘but its not same colour’ or ‘the shape is different’ as if the pieces were made on a production line and from moulds.  If I make thrown domestic ware then the work is repeatable, but less satisfying to do.   The open brief can be quite satisfying, but if the commission is not something that I enjoy doing then I am afraid that it takes a back seat in my list of priorities.

I don’t really enjoy the process of selling or marketing my own work.  ‘Artist and Makers’ Fairs, ( I don’t like the “Craft Market” scenario as it rather gets mixed up with knitted tea cosies and stuff my Mother used to make for Church Bazaars, which I hasten to add have their place in the order of things!), are my main source of direct outlet.   I take part in our County Open Studios fortnight, which I find interesting and rewarding.   I am delighted if Galleries are interested in taking/buying my work, although I dislike the process of having to present myself and my work for scrutiny.  If money were no object then I would play around with ideas more than I am able to do now, experiment and ‘play’ with different techniques.   I have a website, which I am very bad about keeping up to date, thankfully, my Webmaster is good at nagging me.   I don’t do twitter or Facebook.    Fortunately there will always be people who want to buy hand crafted work, and will pay for it, preferring that to the mass produced and significantly cheaper, items in various stores.   It is just a case of finding them!

 

Artist Spotlight: Anne French

My constant desire to experiment sustains my creativity. While working on one project, I am thinking of the next.   As soon as I have found a satisfactory way to make something work, I am looking ahead to the next challenge.

Endless trial and error is how I develop new ideas most of the time, and sometimes expensive and heartbreaking mistakes are made ( I recently finished a very elaborate ‘faux inlay’ china dish; I put it in the oven to bake it – having used a very specific porcelain medium , but it bubbled up, and great blisters appeared. I don’t know what went wrong).

Hundreds of discarded comics strewn around my teenage son’s room, persuaded me to use them somehow. I began a very successful line in contemporary decoupage furniture.  I am constantly inspired by things I see.

Anne French working in studio

 

Working at the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and my work as an artist are constantly intertwined and I absolutely love them both.  I am endlessly enthused by the beautiful things around me; by materials, by colour, by craftsmanship and sometimes, looking and studying an object, I think,  perhaps it would be possible to re-interpret the art form using materials at hand.

The black and white faux inlay was inspired by an antique chest from India inlaid with delicate pieces of mother of pearl.

I left school at 17 and went to Paris on my own. I had always been ‘good with my hands’, and being resourceful and inventive, while living on a shoe string, became a way of life. My first 2 children were born when I was very young, I sewed a lot at the time, and sold patch work quilts to shops. This was over 30 years ago, everybody was into fabrics, Laura Ashley all over the place. Space was at a premium in Paris, and I made everything, through necessity at first, but also from the pure pleasure of creating something either beautiful, or useful, from what would otherwise have been thrown away. I experimented with mosaics, but this became rather hazardous as the children began to walk!

 

I deal with creative lulls by pretending to myself that I am so busy elsewhere that I will have to put the ‘art side’ of things on hold for a while. But I am constantly, constantly thinking about it, and anything can spark an idea – a trip to a Mexican market started a passion for bottle tops and their diverse possibilities.

So I began decoupage, and this has really been my passion since. It has such a genteel, prim reputation, but is so diverse. A rather risqué comic chair, or a delicate faux inlay vase – just paper and string and glue and varnish.

 

I have always been surrounded by artists, there are so many creative people in my family, and my husband’s too. My great great grandfather, Sir Thomas Wardle, was a collaborator of William Morris, perhaps that is why I love fabrics – my grandfather was a painter, as is my sister in Los Angeles, one of my brothers is a woodworker, the other makes films and my husband is a sculptor, so art is all around us. My (five) children are wonderfully creative, and I am very proud of that.

Sometimes I think I would have loved to have been to art school, to have been taught to do things ‘properly’, instead of the endless experimenting, hours, and days, and weeks spent working out how to do something. But in fact I am glad I didn’t. I have always felt so free to go where I wanted, without, necessarily, following the rules.

I will happily undertake a commission which is not too precise i.e. ‘a bedroom chair in faux inlay’, or ‘a small monochrome comic decoupage table’, but I am nervous when I am presented with an old shellac 78, of huge significance, and asked to transform it into a bowl … they are so fragile, and all sorts of disasters can happen.

I can never repeat anything, each leaf is cut out individually, free hand, and no two are ever the same.

I love what I do, but I am not good at promoting (which is such a necessary part of the selling). The system which works best for me is to have my work on show in a gallery. I am so busy all the time, and I would much rather leave that side of things to someone who knows how to do it!

There will always be artists, but I think functional art is probably more in keeping with the modern world. Most of us are pushed for space, so something which looks beautiful, but can serve another purpose, a light, a bowl, a chair is, I think, the way a lot of artists are going.

A few years ago one of my sidelines was flowery dust pans and brushes. I had to go across the channel to find them in pretty colours; over here they were grey or black. Now in every pound shop colour prevails. We expect everything to look beautiful now.

Being self taught, I sometimes feel I am a jack of all trades but a master of none. I have experimented in so many media, tried so many techniques, and I would love one day to have a private lesson with a grand master, be it in mosaic, papier mache, fabric design, decoupage … just to learn the finesse of the craft.

I work at home, so space has always been very limited. I have had to work less and less on large pieces of furniture, concentrating nowadays on small pieces. But, this year (son off to university) I will have a room of my own overlooking the sea, so I wait in anticipation to see what happens! I am so excited.

 

Artist Spotlight: Melanie Pike – Jewellery Designer (recycled materials)

Melanie Pike

Our first  spotlight of this Winter 2012 show features  jewellery designer  Melanie Pike.  Melanie’s jewellery is quirky, funky and completely original and she assembles carefully selected found componants to create new and unique pieces.  The term wearable art is used a lot these days but it does describe Melanie’s work exceptionally well.  There appears to be a secret life behind each piece  with opening doors and secret messages suggesting travel and exploration.  I love her colours and the sense of humour behind the ideas, each  seems have  a particular story to tell, if it could speak it would probably make for a very interesting dinner guest.

You can see Melanie’s work  in the  gallery until February 2013.

 She talks here about her work as an artist, what inspires her and her thoughts about living a creative life!

I create things because I cannot help myself.  I have tried to do other, more ‘sensible’ things but this urge to design and make stuff always catches up with me.  I’ve simply given up resisting it.  Perhaps it’s because I’m a bit older now – I’m in my mid forties – that the idea of ‘getting somewhere’ seems increasingly less important or interesting and the possibilities inherent in being somewhere, here, increasingly more attractive and enjoyable.  

Softly Like Spring – brooch using recycled materials

Designs usually stem from the materials themselves.  Colours, textures, combinations of elements give me an appetite to combine, arrange, juxtapose. I notice ways in which one element can enhance another, or sometimes add humour to another.  At some point a rightness emerges and with it a knowing that this piece works.  I follow my enthusiasm and the time flies.  It is as if there isn’t a me making a something, there is just the flow of making.

 I’ve always been aware that there are certain activities in this life which are their own reward – things we do that have a purpose or goal but that we do for the love of them.  Like gathering mushrooms on a beautiful autumn day in the woods.  The goal is a fine mushroom supper and yet the steps leading up to that are pure pleasure.  This work is in that league for me  and it is a privilege to do something I love that also brings other people pleasure.  Like many people, I am very visual and am struck by the beauty of very ordinary things.  I try to translate that, through my pieces, into a more widely available appeal.

To re-energise,  I take walks, dance, sing, do yoga, work my allotment, nap, cook, go visiting, check out exhibitions… If I am feeling uninspired it is not because ideas aren’t flowing but because life isn’t flowing through me, so that’s what I try to encourage – the flow of life.

 I am a daughter of very creative parents, my dad is an artist and my mum has taught gourmet cooking so there is an inevitability about what I now do.  But it took me a long time to become clear about the path.  You could say I put a lot of obstacles in my own way.  I spent many years thinking I had to be ‘more’ or ‘different or ‘better’ to be happy.  Once I let go of that burden I found I was free to enjoy doing what I love.

Arizona Brooch – created from recycled materials

Because I work with found objects I’m always paying attention to the inanimate elements in my surroundings – pavements and roadsides in the city for the rusty treasures that might be lurking there.  In the country I look for pebbles, beach glass, driftwood, plastic debris, pottery shards, bones (I have some wonderful bird skulls and sheep’s teeth from Wales).  I am amazed by the wealth and variety of fascinating and beautiful materials beneath our feet.  What is it they say, ‘hidden in plain view’?

I work at home and it suits me.  I like to be able to put the carrots on and return to my bench while they cook and sometimes taking a break to do the washing up is exactly what is required in the flow of a creative process.  My workspace is full of good, natural light and because the scale I work to is small it is not difficult to have everything within easy reach.  I have small drawers with loosely classified objects and finds, boxes and tins stacked on shelves, big jars of tools and small bowls of tiny treasures.

I particularly enjoy working to commission.  I like to transform people’s cherished fragments into wearable art.  Almost everyone has some precious items tucked away in a drawer or box – an orphan earring from a  treasured pair, a scrap of fabric rich in associations, a button, pebble or gold ring, elements which can be made into truly one of a kind pieces that speak of the person you are, the life you have lived and of what has mattered to you.  Pieces of jewellery emerging in this way have an intimacy that a mass-produced item can never replicate.  Otherwise I tend to work in series, following the potential of a given material, improving on a design, varying it, dancing with it and then taking what I have discovered forward to inform the next series or project. 

 Thank goodness people like my work and that it sells!  Otherwise I’d run out of living space as my home would become choked with all the pieces I have made.  Selling my work enables me to make more pieces.  Sometimes I hold onto a favourite piece for a while but I am pragmatic so most of it goes on sale.  Realistically, running the business/marketing side of things probably accounts for about fifty percent of my work time.   How confusing daily life would be if money didn’t enter the equation.  I’ve never experienced that.  It’s a simple equation for me, work equals income, lovely and straightforward.

The era we now live in enables a much broader definition of ‘art’ than any that has gone before.  It encompasses an extraordinary diversity of self-expression.  Fortunately, for those of us who are compelled to express ourselves artistically, it would seem that our contribution to life is required and welcome.  I feel immense gratitude to the people who repair roads, staff  hospitals, teach in schools and generally keep the machinery of the civilised world functioning.  I wouldn’t be as good at doing those invaluable jobs as I am at doing what I love to do. 

 I see our role as artists as remembering not to take ourselves or life too seriously.  We introduce playfulness into the equation, don’t we, by introducing another way of seeing the same old thing.  Inspiration means ‘to inhale or breathe in’.   Art is like taking a breath of fresh air, it refreshes.

Listening with the Moon brooch – created with recycled materials

In that way my heart’s desire has been fulfilled.  I have the freedom to play with unusual materials and turn them into treasure or art. This makes me feel like an alchemist, extracting the precious from the mundane and everyday, bringing the overlooked to life.  I look forward to teaching some day, although I’m not sure how that will come about as yet.  It will be a delight to share some of the processes and solutions I have discovered with others.

As far as learning other crafts goes, if I didn’t find jewellery and wearable art so all consuming I’d love to learn stone carving.  I have some gorgeous pieces of alabaster I’ve picked up on the North Somerset coastline and always imagine that at some point I’ll acquire the skills to work it.

  I’ll probably still want to turn it into some wearable adornment, though.

Glimpsing St Ives – Brooch – Created with recycled materials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nice Article in the Richmond and Twickenham Times

Jill Desbo – Artist Spotlight

Jill’s Exhibition puppets have caused a bit of a stir in the showroom, they are undoubtably on the dark side of of the fairy tale spectrum, beautifully made and all quite mesmorising!   They have become the anchor points for this Autumn show and are perfect for the atmosphere of the turning of the leaves into the darker end of the year.  Each puppet has a powerful personality and the character of each one is delectably theatrical.  Jill talks here about her work and her thoughts about what being and artist mean to her.

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I love the physical act of making- either marks on paper when I’m drawing or for etching, or transforming a lump of wax into a character head for a puppet. The desire to get my ideas inside me out into the world keeps me going as an artist! Also I think ideas of mortality drive me, especially as you get older.

I find walking is very productive, once I have the bones of an idea. Sometimes a book like Mervyn Peakes ‘Titus Groan’ will inspire puppets, or Chaucer. Sometimes ideas just land and then it’s a case of working them up through drawings, or straight into the sculpt. I find one piece of work often ‘inspires’ another- i.e. leads into a new thing. I think the discipline of working is important- not necessarily waiting for some inspiration. Once you start, things often just have their own momentum.

Due to this, I rarely have a lull in the flow of ideas – I work freelance as a commercial sculptor; my problem is finding the time to do my own work! The puppets have been repeated or can be, but each one is unique- different colour scheme for example, and embroidery. I have done small editions of sculpture and if they all sell, well that’s great! I don’t have to have a studio myself because I work fairly small, I can work anywhere – even on the train sometimes! And I always take stuff on holiday. I am never without something to do! It excites me and I feel very grateful.

I sell either through open submission exhibitions, or group shows with 11 fellow printmakers (12PM).or through galleries that have my work, plus an online gallery. I hope my choices would be the same, money no object but that’s an interesting one…. maybe the puppets would be life-size if I could house them! But then I like an intimacy of scale. Because I have the ‘day job’ I don’t have the pressure to make my own work consciously ‘saleable’- or really milk something that’s proved a success. I can sort of indulge myself – it’s always something I really want to do rather than trying to work out if it’s going to be ‘saleable’. For artists who live by their own work, I wonder if it’s sometimes constraining.

Artist Spotlight: Adriana Brinsmead-Stockham

 

Casting and sculpting in glass is an exacting discipline which calls for complete technical mastery.  Like all art forms that require real mastery, what emerges if successful, looks effortless, like the artists job was somehow to ‘get out of the way’ to set the work free and to me, Adriana’s works reflects that ideal.  She brings her ideas to life in forms that require an enormous amount of artistry, skill and investment to produce.  The interplay of light through the faultless body of glass makes each piece appear almost weightless, although it’s anything but as the glass itself is lead crystal based. This means each piece can be finished to a state of perfect clarity, allowing the light itself to bring to life the pure saturated colour and complex carved rythmical shapes she creates to describe water’s signature on the landscape.  Here Adriana talks in more detail about her work and how she came to find her path as an artist.

Water is my greatest inspiration. What it represents, what it does, what it gives, takes, forms and re-forms (such as coastlines and landscapes, canyons and mountains).  Its different states – solid, vapour, liquid.  The fact that it is both life-giving yet life-taking, creating new things and also destroying.  All of its contradictions and duality drive me to try and capture it – not only of itself but also how it affects me.  It can look so innocent and calm yet be deadly, it is mercurial in its moods – the sea can be gentle and welcoming one moment and then change to a madness of power and destruction the next. It refreshes yet frightens, invigorates or drains, it cleanses or pollutes – but above all, it continually draws me to it and when I’m by a body of water such as a river, lake or best of all coastline, I feel as if I belong, like a homecoming almost – its very hard to explain.

I develop new designs and ideas by visiting different areas – whether it be the Thames, the South Coast, the Great Canyons of the USA, icebergs in Alaska or the puddle in my garden – I have my camera with me to capture anything that catches my eye – usually the patterns of the water itself or the patterns and designs that water has made on the land and landscape.  I then start thinking about how I can take those images and patterns and translate them into a piece of work.   Being inspired, to me, just means being driven to create something that hopefully captures what I’m experiencing.  When this dries up, I either re-visit bodies of water or start thinking about where I would like to go that I haven’t been to, but my main problem is usually being overwhelmed with ideas and not having enough time or resources to follow them all through.
My life as an artist came fairly late in life.  I wasn’t brought up to believe that being an artist was an acceptable form of employment, let alone an option!  I’ve always loved drawing and photography, just for my own pleasure, and due to a change in personal circumstances I was given the opportunity to go to University to take a degree in Fine Art – however, whilst doing the Access to Education course that my chosen University (UCA Farnham) ran, I discovered that they had a renown Glass department and that sealed my fate for studio glass has always been a love of mine.  So I then embarked on a degree in 3D Design specialising in Glass and have gone on to do an MA in Contemporary Crafts, also in Glass, which I will be completing later this year.
Opening myself up as an artist has made me much more aware of my surroundings rather than taking them for granted or not ‘seeing’ them properly.  I find it hard to experience any sort of landscape that intrigues me without thinking about what I could do with it/how I would represent it – whether it’s a deliberately sought out ‘inspiration’ or one that catches my eye while driving on a motorway or walking round the local supermarket – different things can be very evocative and can ‘jog’ different thought processes – usually related to something I’m either already working on or thinking about doing. The most surprising thing about taking this ‘path’ is that whilst everyone I knew either called me brave (to my face) or just plain crazy, I just felt so excited and lucky to have finally found what I truly want to do and I now have a personal confidence and sense of myself that I have never had before, and never believed possible.

My studio and workspace is extremely important and I enjoy having the option to work on my own when I want to and around others when I don’t.  I like my own company and am a bit of a control freak when it comes to designing/making and hate it when other people use my tools without looking after them properly, but I also enjoy the mad banter that a small group of artists generate – the exchange of ideas, often crazy, and lots of laughter is such a wonderfully creative atmosphere and I cherish it.   I love taking my photographs and they are an intrinsic part of my design process and whilst I’m not bad at composition, my technical skills are more or less dictated by the ‘auto’ settings!  But if I had to work 3D-wise in another medium then it would probably be wood.

To date, I only make one off pieces, not from any sort of snobbery for batch making – but just because that is what I really enjoy doing.  Commissions (for unique pieces) are also something I also appreciate – for whilst initially they might not be what I would have chosen to do myself, to be able to take a brief and produce something that gives someone else pleasure but is also identifiable as my work, is a great sense of achievement.  I mainly leave the selling and marketing of my work to galleries – what I produce is not conducive to selling online and I maintain a website more as a portfolio than as a direct sales tool.  I also exhibit in group exhibitions with other artists but I find stewarding a bit of a bore and would much rather be making something than selling it!  If money were no object I would spend all my time travelling and designing/making and employ someone else to do all the sales, marketing and paperwork!

Adriana’s work will be available through the gallery until Sunday August 5th.

Artist Spotlight: Linda Connelly

It’s surprisingly hard to find good enamellers so I was really happy that Linda agreed to come and show her work here in the gallery.  The humour and light heartedness of her style is instantly attractive and engaging, but understanding the level of patience and skill necessary to create the standard of work she produces takes it to another level.  Here Linda talks about her artistry, the fascinating process of how she creates her work and the inspiration behind it.

Sometimes an idea appears to me almost fully formed. I can see it in my mind and I play around with colours and designs in my head, making notes and drawings on. Then I will need to go through a lengthy process with pen and overlays before the design is completed to my satisfaction.  On other occasions, for instance the Brighton Pavilion clock, I go through an extensive design process from scratch, photographing and drawing the building from life and then collecting all the other source material I can find. Then I work with tracing paper and a fine black pen, first setting out the basic shape and then repeatedly tracing over it to refine the design. Sometimes I do some of this work in Photoshop, particularly when I want to play around with scale or produce a detailed symmetrical image.

As part of this process I also have to consider the techniques and materials I will use to achieve what I want. Often this will involve making numerous tests and experiments with colours and processes. I keep detailed notes at this stage in a ‘Technical Notebook’, often including detailed samples. As each piece can have anything from 6 to a dozen or more separate firings, it is important to rationalize the making process at this stage, and ensure that my planned colours will work well together, both visually and technically. I also have to consider construction of the piece and how this will fit into the enamelling process. Often in jewellery I elect to solder some elements after or partway through the enamelling stage. This is technically demanding but often the best solution. In the case of jewellery I make mock ups and check the visual appearance of the shape, and how it will hang when worn. Finally of course I have to check that it will fit into the kiln!

Inspiration can arise from all kinds of sources. Sometimes during a walk on the beach, patterns in the sand or rocks will suddenly stimulate an idea and I will have to rush off to draw it. Other times, ideas seemingly materialize from ‘thin air’, although often I can trace a path of various stimuli that have suddenly gelled! I can’t envisage an existence without creativity. Sometimes I go through a dry patch but this is like being only half alive. Being driven by a creative force is as essential to me as oxygen in the air to breathe.

I have always known that I had to create. Over the years that creativity has found many outlets, but for me it is not a choice – it’s a part of me. Not being an artist was never an option. Without it I don’t feel fully alive. Even when my children were young and time was short, I still managed to find time to draw ideas. I didn’t have much time to make anything, but putting them on paper so they might happen in the future helped to keep me going.

I have recently had the problem of dealing with a lull in the flow of ideas, and I started reading through some of my vast collection of enamelling and jewellery books. I find that bombarding my mind with images, as well as accumulating knowledge of different techniques helps my sub-conscious to chug away and produce a new idea. Otherwise, looking through my old sketch books usually produces an old idea that never happened before, but now with new experiences and knowledge can come to fruition. To this end I constantly note down ideas and collect source material which I collate into folders and books. I also take every opportunity to visit inspiring galleries and exhibitions as well as subscribing to various jewellery and craft magazines. All of this helps to ensure a constant stream of ideas and inspiration.

I love my studio. I wish it was larger but it is light and well designed for me. For instance my kiln is at a level that I can see into it without having to bend so I don’t strain my back. Everything I need is there and within easy reach. I only wish I could find it!

I have always wanted to try blacksmithing. Similar to jewellery making in that it involves heat and hammers but on a much larger scale! I once went parascending – even though I’m terrified of heights! It was amazing – so quiet flying above the sea looking down on the earth. I could have stayed up there for much longer – especially as I don’t know if I’ll ever be brave enough to do it again!

I think the future is good. I think that more and more people are becoming disillusioned with mass produced, cheap, badly made goods and are looking to buy fewer items that will last longer and are beautifully made and designed. I welcome the challenge of commissions. With regards to repeating work, I tend to only produce small quantities of any one thing as I’m always being excited by the next new ‘brilliant’ idea.

Glass Fusing course last Monday night

 

Thanks and well done to the girls to made last Mondays glass fusing evening such fun!  We spent a very happy three hours cutting glass and playing with colours and designs and the results were really exellent.   A very creative bunch to be sure.  We made rather beautiful jewellery pendants and some VERY pretty window hangers.  Check out the photo below!